This fall, the Supreme Court is set to hear an important case regarding the interpretation of the law that provides for penalties for failing to file an FBAR.  The case will impact many taxpayers who have already been penalized and many more in the future.

In 1970, the Bank Secrecy Act was enacted to curb

The 2017 Tax Act made life harder on individuals living in high tax states (such as New York, New Jersey, and California) by limiting the deduction for state and local taxes (“SALT”) to $10,000.  In an attempt to circumvent this restriction, several states have adopted a new pass-through entity tax imposed on partnerships, LLCs, and

New Jersey has enacted legislation that gives business owners of pass-through entities a way to bypass the $10,000 limit on state and local tax deductions.

The $10,000 state and local tax limitation was implemented under federal law in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.[1] The law has been controversial because of its disproportionate effect on

Reprinted with permission from the 3/28/19 edition of the New Jersey Law Journal© 2019 ALM Media Properties, LLC. All rights reserved. Further duplication without permission is prohibited, contact 877-257-3382 or reprints@alm.com.


In light of ever-present budget shortfalls in most states’ coffers, a go-to revenue generating technique affecting all business owners is a “nexus” audit.

Since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, 138 S.Ct. 2080 (2018), this past summer reversing its long-standing “physical presence” nexus test under Quill Corp. v. North Dakota, 504 U.S. 298 (1992), businesses with contacts in New York have not had guidance on New York’s sales tax requirements