The coronavirus outbreak, the subsequent passage of the CARES Act by the federal government, and current low interest rates have changed the landscape of charitable contributions and planning in 2020.

Charitable Contributions

The CARES Act changes the limitations on charitable giving to encourage individuals and corporations to make cash contributions to public charities.

  1. Above-the-line deduction

New Jersey has enacted legislation that gives business owners of pass-through entities a way to bypass the $10,000 limit on state and local tax deductions.

The $10,000 state and local tax limitation was implemented under federal law in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.[1] The law has been controversial because of its disproportionate effect on

In a closely-watched decision, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that a beneficiary’s residence within a state alone does not subject a trust to such state’s income tax.  In North Carolina Dept. of Revenue v. Kimberley Rice Kaestner 1992 Family Trust, No. 18-457 (U.S. Jun. 21, 2019), North Carolina attempted to tax the income

Reprinted with permission from the 3/28/19 edition of the New Jersey Law Journal© 2019 ALM Media Properties, LLC. All rights reserved. Further duplication without permission is prohibited, contact 877-257-3382 or reprints@alm.com.


In light of ever-present budget shortfalls in most states’ coffers, a go-to revenue generating technique affecting all business owners is a “nexus” audit.

The 2017 Tax Act added a new tax on US shareholders of controlled foreign corporations (“CFCs”), the tax on Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (“GILTI”).  GILTI often includes active business income and thus has a widespread impact.

For US C corporations, the regular 21% tax is reduced by a 50% deduction, which lowers the tax rate